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NCAA Eligibility Center


Athletes that plan on competing at the NCAA Division I or Division II level are required to register with the NCAA Eligibility Center (formerly referred to as the NCAA Clearinghouse). The Eligibility Center evaluates your amateur status, core courses taken in high school, GPA, and standardized test scores to determine if you’re eligible at the Division I or Division II level as a freshman.

Remember, you cannot participate in Division I or Division II athletics if you aren’t cleared by the NCAA Eligibility Center.

 

Registering with the NCAA Eligibility Center

Online registration takes less than one hour at the NCAA Eligibility Center website. Detailed information about registration is available online and by downloading the NCAA’s Guide for the College-Bound Student-Athlete. Ideally, you should register during the summer after your junior year of high school.

 

 

NCSA explains why you need to sign up with the NCAA Eligibility Center and how it’s done.

 

Requirements for Eligibility

More detailed requirements for eligibility can be found in the Guide for the College-Bound Student-Athlete. But here are the basic guidelines outlining what you need to be aware of to ensure NCAA eligibility.

 

Meeting Core Course Requirements

Core courses are academic courses taught at a college preparatory level. If you’re not sure if some of your classes meet this criteria, ask your guidance counselor.

Core Course Requirements for Division I

  • 4 years of English
  • 3 years of math (Algebra 1 or higher)
  • 2 years of natural or physical science
  • 1 extra year of English, math, or natural or physical science
  • 2 years of social science
  • 4 years of extra core course (any category above or foreign language, comparative religion/philosophy)

Core Course Requirements for Division II

  • 3 years of English
  • 2 years of math (Algebra 1 or higher)
  • 2 years of natural or physical science
  • 3 extra years of English, math, or natural or physical science
  • 2 years of social science
  • 4 years of extra core course (any category above or foreign language, comparative religion/philosophy)

 

Standardized Test Scores/Grade Point Average

Division I uses a sliding scale to match SAT and ACT scores with a core grade-point average. A minimum GPA of 2.000 is required in your core courses.

Division II requires a minimum SAT score of 820 or an ACT sum score of 68. A minimum GPA of 2.000 is required in your core courses.

 

Note: When registering for the SAT or ACT be sure to use the NCAA Eligibility Center code of 9999 to ensure that scores are sent directly to NCAA.

 

Amateurism

NCAA eligibility rules also require amateurism certification. The NCAA Eligibility Center asks several questions about your participation in athletics to verify your status as an amateur. Some items that may raise a red flag concerning your amateur status:

  • A contract with professional team
  • Prize money or salary earned through athletics
  • Tryouts, practice or competition with a professional team
  • Benefits from an agent or agreement to be represented by an agent
  • Delayed full-time college enrollment in order to participate in organized sports
  • Any financial assistance stemming from athletics participation

 

Learn more about the NCAA.

You know about the NCAA Eligibility Center, now find out more

About the NCAA and its role in the recruiting process.

Communication with College Coaches

Coach communications guidelines vary according to the level of competition and by specific sport. The NCAA strictly regulates the recruiting process and dictates when and how college coaches can approach you.

 

When will I start hearing from coaches?

You won’t see any official “recruiting materials” from NCAA Division I and II schools in the mail before the summer of your junior year. And that’s because coaches at these levels can’t send specific recruiting literature until then. (Note: Division III and NAIA coaches can send recruiting materials at any time in high school.)

But that doesn’t mean the recruiting process doesn’t start until junior year. Coaches can send you the following at any time in high school:

  • Questionnaires
  • Camp brochures
  • General college information from the admissions department

Can I contact coaches at schools that I’m interested in?

Absolutely, and you definitely should.

***Phone Calls

In most sports phone calls are limited and coaches can’t start making them until after your junior year (basketball and football and major exceptions and allow some calls during your junior year). Coaches are regulated, but there’s no limit on how many calls you can make to coaches as long as those calls are at your own expense. Take advantage of this and establish communication with coaches early and often.

***Emails and Letters

Communication with coaches by emails or printed letters can certainly put you on their radar. Try not to send the same generic email/letter to each coach. Make the correspondence specific. Mention something about the college that you like, or congratulate a coach on a big win. Personalized contact might just set you apart from others.

Also, make sure you close every email or letter with a professional signature. Include your name, address, email, cell number, and NCSA recruiting profile link.

 

***What about text messages?

A new rule adopted by the NCAA allows recruit/coach communications via text message only for Division I men’s basketball recruits. It’s likely that the NCAA may relax text messaging rules for other sports in the near future.

 

Coach Communications Guidelines

Below is a brief overview of NCAA rules for communications with college coaches. For in-depth recruiting rules download the most recent NCAA Guide for the College-Bound Student-Athlete

 

NCAA Division I

  • Coaches start sending recruiting materials on September 1 of your junior year (except in men’s basketball and men’s hockey where coaches can begin sending printed materials on June 15 after your sophomore year).
  • You can call coaches any time you want but in most sports they cannot call you until you are a junior (calls can start June 15 after your sophomore year if you’re a men’s basketball recruit).

 

NCAA Division II

  • Coaches can start mailing recruiting material, calling you, and making off-campus contact on June 15 before your junior year in high school.

 

NCAA Division III and NAIA

  • Coaches can send printed materials and call at any time.

 

The Recruiting Process

College coaches are looking for the best athletes they can find. So, they reach out to a lot of them, talk to a few, and eventually offer scholarships to just a small fraction. This is known as the recruiting funnel.

Coaches start with a huge sample of recruits but narrow their scholarship offers down to very few. Even a phone call is no guarantee. Roughly 1 in 20 athletes that receive a phone call from a coach ever play for that coach.

That’s why understanding the funnel and knowing what you can do to make sure you stay in it greatly increase your chances of landing an athletic scholarship. You have to realize that nothing in the recruiting process is handed to you. But, just like on the playing field or court, hard work and determination can provide a big payoff.

 

How do you survive the funnel? Remember these key points.

  • Realize that the recruiting process is a two-way street. It’s not just about coaches getting in touch with you, you also have to reach out to them. Make phone call and send letters and emails to coaches you want to play for. Coaches want athletes who take initiative.
  • Stay humble. Remember that there are thousands of other athletes out there that are just as good or better than you. Make it a point to work harder than other athletes during the recruiting process.

 

An Example of the Recruiting Funnel in Football

  • A college football coaching staff sends out 10,000 to 15,000 letters and they watch 1,000 to 2,000 videos.
  • They make only 500 phone calls to potential recruits.
  • They verbally offer between 65 and 200 scholarships and extend up to 85 offers for official visits.
  • They finally only sign a maximum of 25 players each year.

 

A True Story About the Recruiting Funnel

Chris was a standout football player in high school and received plenty of letters and interest from college coaches. When he was a junior he noticed that his friends were making college visits, committing to schools and getting scholarships. But he wasn’t.

Chris didn’t know about the recruiting funnel, and he thought that the multitude of letters he was getting early in high school meant that he’d have a spot on a college football team waiting for him. He was wrong.

What did Chris do wrong? For one, he wasn’t proactive enough and didn’t express interest in schools by contacting coaches and sending letters. Also, he didn’t realize that he was just one of roughly 15,000 athletes getting the same letters from colleges.

The good news is that Chris realized his mistakes and went into high gear. He called and wrote as many coaches as he could and eventually landed a scholarship at Vanderbilt.

“Chris” is Chris Krause, the founder of NCSA. He now spends his life making sure that no athlete misses their chance the way he almost did. The recruiting process is tough to understand, but once you learn how it works, there’s no excuse not to make the right moves.

 

Baseball Catcher

 

Tier 1 Catcher:

Physical Measurables:

  • Height: 6'1”
  • Weight: 200 lbs.

 

Stats: 

  • OB %:.500
  • Slugging: .600 (Minimum 2 AB's per game)
  • Pop Time: 1.95 and below consistently (Verified by a neutral source)
  • ERA below 2.00

 

NCSA Expert Notes:

Division I catching recruits are evaluated on several levels, most importantly, college coaches will look at the defensive and leadership skills that the catcher possesses. Prototypical Division I catching recruits are developed physically and usually stand anywhere between 5’10’’ and 6’4” and weigh between 185 and 220 pounds. While pop time is important, coaches will take a closer look at the catch and throw mechanics the catcher possesses as well as the arm strength shown while throwing to 2nd and 3rd base. While defense comes first for a catcher, Division I coaches will also look for a player that demonstrates outstanding leadership skills and has the ability to work with an entire pitching staff. Another important factor in evaluating a Division I catcher is hitting. Division I recruits at the catching position swing the bat well. Catchers are usually guys that can hit for power or average at a high level.

 

Tier 2 Catcher

Physical Measurables:

  • Height: 6'0''
  • Weight: 180 lbs.

 

Stats: 

  • OB%: .450
  • Slugging: .550 (Minimum 2 AB's per game)
  • Pop Time: 2.0 and below consistently (Verified by a neutral source)
  • ERA below 3.00

 

NCSA Expert Notes:

Catchers in this tier are usually polished in at least one phase of the game and show the ability to improve in all other areas of the game. Whether it is defensively or offensively, a solid Division II catching prospect demonstrates the ability to excel at the plate as a 

 

Tier 3 Catcher

Physical Measurables:

  • Height: 5'11
  • Weight: 180 lbs.

 

Stats: 

  • OB%: . 400
  • Slugging: .500
  • Pop time: 2.0 - 2.1

 

NCSA Expert Notes:

Catchers at this level posses leadership skills.  Size is important, along with the abilities to block, receive, handle a pitching staff, and catch/throw.

 

Tier 4 Catcher

Physical Measurables:

  • Height: 5’10”,
  • Weight: 170 lbs.

 

Stats: 

  • OB %: .350
  • Slugging: .450
  • Pop Time: 2.1 or below

 

NCSA Expert Notes:

All catchers who go on to play in college should have leadership skills, but catchers at these levels usually lack the size and quickness needed to play at higher levels. 

Tier 1 Pitcher:

Physical Measurables:

  • As low at 84 MPH consistently and ranging to 95+
  • 2 Additional pitches thrown to spots consistently

 

Stats: 

  • ERA below 2.00
  • At least 1 K per IP
  • Walk less than 1 batter per 2 IP

 

NCSA Expert Notes:

The first thing a Division I coach will look for when evaluating a pitcher is fastball velocity. Prototypical Division I pitching recruits throw anywhere between 87 and 95 MPH on a consistent basis. It is important to remember that coaches are looking for pitchers to consistently throw at this velocity, not just touch it every once and a while. While velocity is very important in evaluation, for a Division I pitcher, command and control are also factors that determine if a recruit can play at this level. Division I pitchers must also display command of at least 3 pitches. Having a great fastball will only get a Division I pitcher so far, having a repertoire of three or four pitches gives the pitcher the ability to keep hitters off balance. Pitch movement will also be important for pitchers with aspirations to play at the Division I level. Throwing a fastball at 87 MPH with a lot of movement can often times be more effective than throwing a straight fastball at 90 MPH. In terms of statistics, Division I pitching recruits have an ERA below 2.00, average at least one strikeout per inning, and walk less than one or less batters every two innings. On average, they have the ability to throw many innings, and most often they are only used on the mound and rarely as position players.

 

 

Tier 2 Pitcher

Physical Measurables:

  • As low as 82 MPH consistently and ranging to 90+
  • 1 additional pitch thrown to spots consistently

Stats: 

  • ERA below 3.00
  • Around 1 K per IP
  • Walk around 1 batter per 2 IP

 

NCSA Expert Notes:

While pitchers in this tier may not be as polished as a D-I recruit, they definitely show the capability to pitch at a high level down the road. Pitchers in this category usually throw anywhere from the low 80s to high 80s in high school, and have the potential to gain more velocity down the road. Pitchers in this category will also have secondary pitches that can become "out pitches" with continued development and practice.

 

 

Tier 3 Pitcher

Physical Measurables:

  • Pitchers in this tier typically throw velocities of 77 MPH - 82 MPH
  • These pitchers will have control of at least one off-speed pitch and be developing another.

Stats: 

  • ERA between 2.50-3.50
  • Strike out to walk ratio of 1:1

 

NCSA Expert Notes:

While pitchers in this tier are still developing arm strength and off-speed pitches, they can still control at least their fastball and one off-speed pitch.  Movement on the fastball and off-speed pitches along with the ability to locate these pitches will be important 

 

 

Tier 4 Pitcher

Physical Measurables:

  • Velocities for recruits in this tier really varies, but recruits usually have success with a fastball and are working on a secondary pitch or are more of a "junk pitcher" in high school

Stats: 

  • 1 or less than 1 K per Inning Pitched
  • ERA below 4.00

 

NCSA Expert Notes:

Pitchers at this level still have development left to go. They may have not had the highest level of success on the mound in high school, but have a strong desire and work ethic to continue to improve. Pitching is always in need at any level and this tier is no

Tier 1 Centerfield


Physical Measurables:

  • A 60 yard dash below 6.7 is the norm for a high level Division I centerfield recruit.
  • Also, they should register anywhere between 87 and 95+ MPH from the outfield on the radar gun. 

Stats: 

  • OB %: .500
  • Slugging: .600 (Minimum 2 AB's per game)

NCSA Expert Notes:

The typical Division I centerfielder is very, very fast. Division I centerfield recruits must also possess a strong arm. The Division I centerfield recruit must also be a leader, so communication with other outfielders and middle infielders will be key. In terms of hitting, the Division I centerfield recruit is viewed more often than not as a top of the order type of hitter, with the occasional outlier being a centerfielder that hits for power and fits in better in the middle of the lineup. The ability to get on base, steal bases, and score from first on extra base hits will be important for Division I centerfield recruits. Size is not as important for centerfielders, but a prototypical Division I centerfield recruit is generally between 5’9’’ and 6’2’’ while weighing between 175 and 210 pounds.

 

 

Tier 2 Centerfield 

Physical Measurables:

  • A 60 yard dash anywhere below 6.9 is desired for Division II recruits.

Stats: 

  • OB: .450
  • SLG: .500 (Minimum 2 AB's per game)

NCSA Expert Notes:

Division II centerfielder's will be expected to field their position exceptionally well. Similar to a MIF, defense is almost always the first priority for a Division II centerfielder. After defense, college coaches at the Division II level will look for centerfielders that can swing the bat well and hit at the top or the bottom of the lineup. A Division II centerfielder usually excels in one area of the game and shows the potential to develop in other areas.

Tier 3 Centerfield 

Physical Measurables:

  • Height: 5'11''
  • Weight: 180 lbs.
  • 60 Yard Dash: 6.9 or below
  • Velocity from the OF of 80+ MPH

Stats: 

  • OB% .400
  • Slugging: .500

NCSA Expert Notes:

Speed, range, getting on-base, and stealing bases are all qualities centerfielders at this level will possess.  A power hitting centerfielder is a bonus, but might sacrifice some speed aspects of the game.  Coaches will look for centerfielders who can cover ground and be a leader in the outfield.

 

 

Tier 4 Centerfield 

Physical Measurables:

  • Height: 5’10”
  • Weight: 170 lbs.
  • 60 Yard Dash: 7.0 or below
  • Velocity from the OF: 78+ MPH

Stats: 

  • OB %: .350
  • Slugging: .450 

NCSA Expert Notes:

Centerfielders in this tier still need to have speed, be able to cover a lot of ground in the outfield, and get on base, but may just not be fast enough to play at a high level or be raw offensively. Arm strength may lack as well.

 

Tier 1 Corner Outfielder

 

Physical Measurables:

  • A 60 yard dash anywhere below 6.8 is desired at the Division I level for corner outfielders.
  • Velocity from the OF: 87+ MPH (Verified by a neutral source)

Stats: 

  • The Division I corner outfielder that hits for power will generally hit at least 5 HRs as a Junior and Senior in high school.
  • OB %: .500
  • Slugging: .750 (Minimum 2 AB's per game)

NCSA Expert Notes:

Division I corner outfield recruits are usually outstanding hitters. Some corner outfield recruits will hit for power, others will hit for average and steal a lot of bases. Qualities in a hitter’s swing that Division I coaches will look for are: bat speed, a short, compact stroke, and balance with the ability to hit all kinds of pitches. The ability to hit the ball to all fields is also important for a Division I hitter. If a Division I corner outfielder does not hit for power, then he must hit for a high average and run very well. 

 

 

Tier 2 Corner Outfielder 

Physical Measurables:

  • A 60 yard dash anywhere below 7.0 is desired at the Division II level for corner outfielders.
  • Velocity from the OF: low 80s at least, with the potential to improve.

Stats: 

  • Power hitter: Multiple HRs as a Junior and Senior in HS.
  • Average/on-base hitter: A lot of SBs and a high OBP in HS.

NCSA Expert Notes:

Division II corner outfielders must excel in at least one phase of the game, whether it be hitting for power, hitting for average, or fielding his position at a high level. Most coaches in this tier will look for a corner outfielder that hits well, but may need to improve defensively.

 

 

Tier 3 Corner Outfielder 

Physical Measurables:

  • Height: 5'11",
  • Weight: 180 lbs.
  • 60 Yard Dash: 6.9 or below
  • Velocity from the OF: 80+ MPH

Stats: 

  • OB%: .400
  • Slugging: .650

NCSA Expert Notes:

Corner outfielders at this level will posses one or two of the qualities of D1 corner outfielders.  Power hitting corner outfielders may not have speed.  Speed corner outfielders may lack a strong arm.  The qualities are important parts to the baseball program and can have big impacts on the team.

 

 

Tier 4 Corner Outfielder 

Physical Measurables:

  • Height: 5’10”
  • Weight: 170 lbs.
  • 60 Yard Dash: 7.0 or below
  • Velocity from the OF: 78+ MPH

Stats: 

  • OB %: .350
  • Slugging: .600 

NCSA Expert Notes:

Lower level corner outfielders may hit for power but not consistently. They may hit for a high average and have good speed, but not have the experience at these positions or against good competition.

Tier 1 First Baseman:

Physical Measurables:

  • Height: Between 6’2’’ and 6’6’’
  • Weight between 190 and 240 pounds

 

Stats: 

  • First basemen interested in playing at the Division I level generally hit 5-10 homeruns as a Junior and Senior in high school
  • OB %: .500
  • Slugging: .750 (Minimum 2 AB's per game)

 

NCSA Expert Notes:

Division I first basemen are generally very developed physically before getting to college. The biggest factor in evaluating a Division I first baseman is the ability to hit for power and drive runs in. Coaches evaluating a hitting skills video of a first baseman will look for a short, compact swing, quick bat speed, and a load or hitting mechanism that generates a lot of power. Fielding ability is not as important for a first baseman, as long as he can make the routine play on a regular basis.

 

Tier 2 First Baseman 

Physical Measurables:

  • Height: At least 6'0'';
  • Weight: At least 180 lbs.

 

Stats: 

  • Need to demonstrate the ability or potential to hit for power. 
  • A solid 1B recruit in this tier should have a few HRs and a lot of RBIs as a Junior and Senior in HS.

 

NCSA Expert Notes:

The most important factor in recruiting for 1B is the ability to hit for power or for a high average. While a 1B recruit in this tier may not be as polished, he should definitely show the potential to hit for power at some point in the near future.

 

 

Tier 3 First Baseman 

Physical Measurables:

  • Height: 6'0"
  • Weight: 180 lbs.

 

Stats: 

  • Power Numbers: 3+ HR, 25+ RBI

 

NCSA Expert Notes:

First basemen at this level will posses some qualities, but not all of high level athletes at this position.  Regardless, this is an offensive position at this level.

 

Tier 4 First Baseman 

Physical Measurables:

  • Height: 5’11”
  • Weight: 170 lbs.

Stats: 

  • Power Numbers: 2+ HR, 20+RBI

 

NCSA Expert Notes:

Like many positions, size is lacking for players in this tier. If they do have good size, athleticism may be missing or power. It is very important for  college level first baseman to hit for power and drive in runs. This may be projectable for players who end up at this level.

Tier 1 Middle Infielder:


Physical Measurables:

  • A Division I middle infield recruit will generally run between a 6.5 and a 6.8 60 yard dash. This time needs to be verified by a 3rd party for college coaches to truly believe it.
  • In terms of arm strength, Division I middle infield recruits will throw the ball across the diamond anywhere between 85 MPH and 95 MPH. 

Stats: 

  • OB %: .500; Slugging: .600 (Minimum 2 AB's per game)

NCSA Expert Notes:

Division I middle infielders are evaluated first from a defensive standpoint, and then from an hitting standpoint. The most important factors when evaluating a Division I middle infielder defensively are speed, quickness, good hands, and arm strength. Coaches at the Division I level will look for middle infielders that display outstanding defensive ability in all of these categories. While having a fast 60 time is important, college coaches will also look for an agile middle infielder that can cover a lot of ground laterally, this is often referred to as range. Having great range allows the middle infielder to field ground balls that may deep in the hole or up the middle. Division I middle infielders will also be able to hit at a high level. The prototypical Division I middle infield recruit can hit for a high average as well as steal a lot of bases and occasionally hit for power.

 

 

Tier 2 Middle Infielder

Physical Measurables:

  • Prototypical Division II MIFs stand anywhere between 5'8'' and 6'2''
  • Weight is between 165 and 190 lbs.
  • 60 Yard Dash: 6.9 or below.
  • Infield Velocity: Low 80s and above from SS.

Stats: 

  • OB%: .550;
  • Slugging: .450 (Minimum 2 AB's per game)

NCSA Expert Notes:

Division II MIFs must be polished in at least one phase of the game (fielding or hitting), but more often than not they are more of an asset defensively and have things to work on from a hitting standpoint. Speed is still a quality that coaches will look for at this 

 

Tier 3 Middle Infielder

Physical Measurables:

  • Height: 5'11"
  • Weight: 170 lbs.
  • 60 Yard Dash: 7.0 or below
  • Velocity from the INF: 78+ MPH from SS

Stats: 

  • OB%: .400
  • Slugging: .500

NCSA Expert Notes:

Athleticism, knowledge of the game, and leadership skills are necessary for shortstops at this level.  Defensive skills are the focus for shortstops, with offensive skills being a bonus.  Shortstops at this level will be missing a few elements of the D1 shortstop, but they still make plays and contribute in the line-up.

 

 

Tier 4 Middle Infielder

Physical Measurables:

  • Height: 5’10”
  • Weight: 165 lbs.
  • 60 Yard Dash: 7.1 or below
  • Velocity from the INF: Upper 70’s MPH from SS

Stats: 

  • OB %: .350
  • Slugging: .450

NCSA Expert Notes:

A good shortstop is always in need for a college coach and this tier is no different. This should be the best athlete on the field, but these shortstops aren't playing at higher levels because of a lack of speed and lateral quickness. They make the plays, but don't have the best range. A batting average may be sacrificed for a great leader in the field.

Tier 1 Third Basemen

Physical Measurables:

  • The typical Division I third base recruit stands anywhere between 5’10’’ and 6’3’’
  • Weight is between 180 and 220 pounds

Stats: 

  • Division I third base recruits generally throw the ball across the diamond anywhere between 85 and 95 MPH.
  • Third basemen interested in playing at the Division I level generally hit 5-10 homeruns as a Junior and Senior in high school.
  • OB %: .500
  • Slugging: .750 

NCSA Expert Notes:

Division I recruits at third base must possess a mixture of skills both defensively and offensively. Important factors on a defensive basis are arm strength and footwork. While Division I third basemen do not have to be particularly fast, they do have to show the ability to move side to side quickly in order to cover a lot of ground at third base. Being able to field the ball and also being able to throw the ball at a high velocity can give the recruit a chance to play at the Division I level. From and offensive standpoint, third basemen must show the ability to hit for power and average. Division I third base recruits are often times looked at as power hitters in the middle of the lineup. 

 

 

Tier 2 Third Basemen

Physical Measurables:

  • The typical Division II (Tier 2) 3B stands anywhere between 5'9" and 6'3''
  • Weight is between 170 and 220 pounds.

Stats: 

  • Infield Velocity: At least 80 MPH with the ability to improve through development.
  • HR: At least 2 HR as a Junior and Senior.
  • OBP/SLG: At least .400 in each category.

NCSA Expert Notes:

Division II 3B must be polished in at least one phase of the game and possess the potential to develop in all other areas. 3B in this tier must swing the bat and field their position adequately in high school in order to play at this level in college. 3B at this level must also be able to run adequately, anywhere below a 7.5 60 time will suffice.

 

 

Tier 3 Third Basemen

Physical Measurables:

  • Height: 6'0,
  • Weight: 180 lbs.

Stats: 

  • Power Numbers: 2+ HR, 25+ RBI

NCSA Expert Notes:

Third basemen at this level will posses some qualities, but not all of high level athletes at this position.  Regardless, this is a position requiring a mix of defensive and offensive talents.

 

 

Tier 4 Third Basemen

Physical Measurables:

  • Height: 5’11”,
  • Weight: 170 lbs.

Stats: 

  • Power Numbers: 2+ HR, 20+RBI

NCSA Expert Notes:

Lower level third base recruits should still have a strong arm and be able to hit for power, but may only flash these abilities versus do it consistently. The same goes for quick reflexes in the field.